WEP 0066: Swift Programming in the Classroom: An Interview with Brian Foutty

An Interview with Brian Foutty


In this episode Kelly interviews Brian Foutty about why everyone should learn to code and why the Swift Programming Language is the language to pursue.

Brian Foutty is Apple Distinguished Educator and  the Innovative Learning Specialist in charge of his districts’ iPad 1:1 initiative and has been charged with implementing and maintaining the iPad deployment, MDM software, supporting staff and students with IT support, professional development, student learning on iPad. Additionally, Brian teaches the Swift programming language and iOS app development to Career/Tech students. Brian has developed and published 13 iOS apps and is the author of iTunes U course “A Swift Time to Code” which was featured by Apple in 2015. Brian has been using iPad since its launch. Follow Brian on Twitter at @bfoutty

Sponsor:

This episode of The Wired Educator Podcast is sponsored by: Planbook.com: the greatest lesson planning software on the planet, and it’s only one dollar a month.

Mentioned in this Podcast:

Brian Foutty’s Blog: https://www.ifoutty.com

Foutty App Development: http://www.fouttyappdevelopment.com/Fouttyappdevelopment/Welcome.html
Trumbull Career & Technical Center: www.tctchome.com

Brian Foutty’s iTunes U courses

Swift Materials:

The App Development with Swift Curriculum:

Accidental Tech PodcastEpisode 205: “People Don’t Use the Weird Parts” 

Social Media
Follow Brian on Twitter – @bfoutty https://twitter.com/bfoutty
Follow Brian on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/brian.foutty

Other Mentions: GitHub, Swift, iPad Palooza, Workflow, Overcast Podcast App, Stackover, Daniel Buddo, Frasier Spears, Redit

Kelly’s most influential books:

Brian’s Most Influential Reads:

The Wired Educator Podcast is sponsored by: Planbook.com: the greatest lesson planning software on the planet, and it’s only one dollar a month.

WEP 0065: Hacking Project Based Learning with Erin Murphy and Ross Cooper

An Interview with the Authors of Hacking Project Based Learning: 10 Easy Steps to PBL and Inquiry in the Classroom

Kelly interviews Erin Murphy and Ross Cooper, the authors a great new book titled Hacking Project Based Learning: 10 Easy Steps to PBL and Inquiry in the Classroom.

Ross Cooper is the coauthor of Hacking Project Based Learning, and the Supervisor of Instructional Practice K-12 in the Salisbury Township School District (1:1 MacBook/iPad) in Allentown, Pennsylvania. He is an Apple Distinguished Educator and a Google Certified Innovator. His passions are inquiry-based learning and quality professional development.

Erin Murphy is coauthor of Hacking Project Based Learning. Currently, she has the pleasure of serving as the assistant principal of Eyer Middle School in the East Penn School District. As a certified literacy specialist, she also coordinates the middle level ELA department.

Mentioned in this podcast:

• The book: Hacking Project Based Learning: 10 Easy Steps to PBL and Inquiry in the Classroom

• Ross’s website/blog: rosscoops31.com

• Erin’s website/blog: psumurphette.com

• Erin’s favorite book: Manic Magee

• Ross’s favorite books: Understanding by Design by Wiggins & McTighe and UnSelfie: Why Empathetic Kids Succeed in Our All-About-Me World by Michele Borba

• The Breathe App for mindfulness.

• Inquiry Based Learning

The Hack Learning Series Books

Scrivener: The best writing software for everyone!


Buy Scrivener 2 for macOS (Education Licence)

WEP 0064: The Writing on the Classroom Wall: An Interview with Steve Wyborney

An Interview with educator and author, Steve Wyborney

In this podcast, Kelly interviews Steve Wyborney, the author of The Writing on The Classroom Wall. Kelly and Steve talk about Steve’s 24 beliefs about education and why you will want to share your educational beliefs with your students. Kelly interviews Steve about his book, and they cover many educational topics.

Steve Wyborney is a District Math Coach from Ontario, Oregon. Steve has been a 2nd-5th grade teacher, a building instructional coach, and now works with all teachers of math from kindergarten through high school in his school district.

Steve is well-known for his use of instructional technology and his passion for mathematics. He frequently shares strategies and resources at conferences and through his blog at www.stevewyborney.com. He has also received numerous teaching awards. He was the recipient of the L. E. Wesche Outstanding Educator Award, was a national finalist for the Kinder Excellence in Teaching Award, and was the 2005 Oregon Teacher of the Year.

Steve is the author of 14 books. His most recent book, The Writing on the Classroom Wall, describes his reflective journey that led to posting his 24 most passionate beliefs about teaching and learning on the wall of his classroom and how he shared them with students and wove them into the fabric of the classroom community. Additionally, it encourages educators to wrestle with their own beliefs about students, teaching, and learning and to share those beliefs with their students.

Steve is active on Twitter @stevewyborney and frequently moderates chats including an ongoing chat about The Writing on the Classroom Wall. #TWOTCW

Mentioned in this podcast: 

Steve’s book: The Writing on the Classroom Wall

Planbook.com: The best way to plan your lessons.

The book, Hacking Project Based Learning: 10 Easy Steps to PBL and Inquiry in the Classroom by Ross Cooper and Erin Murphy

The popular robot, Sphero 2.0, which is an educational robot that is becoming incredibly popular in classrooms across the world.

Follow Steve on Twitter at: @stevewyborney

Check out Steve’s blog at: www.stevewyborney.com

Scrivener: The best writing software for everyone!


Buy Scrivener 2 for macOS (Education Licence)

 

 

WEP 0063: Jennifer Serravallo on Reading Strategies and Writing Strategies

An Interview with Jennifer Serravallo, Author of The Reading Strategies Book and The Writing Strategies Book

Kelly interviews author, speaker, and educator, Jennifer Serravallo in this 63rd episode of The Wired Educator Podcast.

Jennifer is the author of several awesome books on education including: The Literacy Teacher’s Playbook, The Reading Strategies Book and her upcoming Writing Strategies Book. Kelly and Jennifer talk about her writing, and great reading and writing practices.

Remember, all educators are teachers of reading and writing.

Jennifer was a teacher in Title I Schools in NYC, and later a Senior Staff Developer at the Teachers College Reading and Writing Project at Columbia University. She is now a national consultant and speaker who helps urban, suburban, and rural schools implement exceptional literacy instruction. She is the author of numerous books on the teaching of reading and writing including the New York Times bestseller, The Reading Strategies Book and the two-time award-winning Independent Reading Assessment series. Her latest book, The Writing Strategies Book, will be released in February 2017. Check out her blog at www.jenniferserravallo.com and tweet her @jserravallo.

Pre-Order Now!

Mentioned in this podcast: 

The Reading Strategies Book by Jennifer Serravallo.

Pre-Order The Writing Strategies Book NOW! And be one of the first to receive it when it ships!

The Art of Teaching Writing by Lucy McCormick Calkins.

In the Middle, Third Edition: A Lifetime of Learning About Writing, Reading, and Adolescents by Nancy Atwell. 

Jennifer’s podcast: Teachers Ask Jen Serravallo!

Jennifer is on Twitter: @jserravallo
Jennifer’s blog and website: www.jenniferserravallo.com
Jennifer’s Facebook group connected to Reading and Writing Strategies:
Heinemann: www.heinemann.com
Scrivener: The best writing software for everyone!


Buy Scrivener 2 for macOS (Education Licence)

iPads and My Golf-Club Metaphor

WE Golf Club Metaphor

I own a lot of iOS devices. In fact, I may very well own them all. Seriously.

People know me as an “Apple guy” and contact me when they need help choosing “the right” device for them.

The answer to that question can be as simple and complex as you wish to make it.

For me, each iOS device has its unique role and purpose.

While I am not suggesting you need every iOS device, I would like you to hear me out and digest my Golf Club Metaphor:

I have met some amazing golfers, of which I am not one, that are so good they could easily crush me with a single golf club to my entire bag. I don’t really know for sure, but I can imagine my friend Del selecting an 8-iron and using it to drive, chip, and even putt.  There is no doubt in my mind he would beat me with that one club on every hole.

While that one club really could serve my friend well, it does not serve me; I’m just not that good. I need the extra distance the driver will give me, the accuracy of a putter, and all of the other advantages I can’t even appreciate in the other clubs.

A single iPhone or iPad absolutely can indeed serve all of your needs. There is no question. I have used my iPhone to write scenes in a novel, pay bills, sell items on eBay, and even create artwork that I have sold. Still, I am better served when I have a specific tool for each job.

I want to have a bag of great tools at my disposal to do my best work and play my best game. I know not everyone can afford to have a bunch of devices. I get it. These devices, however, do last a long time, in fact my original iPad still works great. Amazing. I also love how they all sync to each other, so the work I am doing on one picks up exactly where I left off on the other.

Here’s what I am using and why:

iPhone 7 Plus: Your smartphone is your go-to device for most of your work and most of your diversions. You use it every day and most of the hours of the day. I am always perplexed by people who hesitate to upgrade to a new one or repair a damaged one. Your smartphone is like your car; you need a dependable one. I really hesitated on getting the bigger model, but I am glad I did.  I love, love, love the camera and reading on the device. I went all-out and purchased the biggest model. I need lots of room for photos, apps, and videos. I was worried the bigger model would be too big. It’s not. It fits in my hand and pocket fine. And the camera… Wow!

iPad Air 2: I use this iPad for consuming. This is my everywhere iPad. This iPad can go everywhere and I can get some serious work with it. Still, it does not fit in my pocket so I have to carry it. If I don’t want to carry it I will take an iPad mini, which actually does fit in my khaki pockets but not my jeans.

iPad Pro 12.9 inch: I use this iPad for creating. I’m an artist and this is the greatest pad ever! If you are an artist and haven’t tried the Apple Pencil and iPad Pro… you must demo it. It made such a huge impact on my art. I use the Apple Pencil and the Procreate app to do all of my artwork.)  I love reading magazines on it with the Texture apple because they are the size of actual magazines. I love to read comics on it using Marvel Unlimited because they are actual size of comics. I use both iBooks and Kindle apple to read books. Both fantastic. I use the Blogo app to blog and Scrivener app to write my books. This iPad is now my creation workhorse. The best keyboard and case for the iPad Pro 12.9 inch is the Logitech Create iPad Pro Case. 

iPod touch: I use this for flights and travel. It saves my iPhone battery. I also like having a backup device when I travel. Lots of perks.

iPod nano: I use this for music during my art presentations and conference presentations. I connect it to my speaker system and it’s a go. I make special playlists for every presentation. Opening, work in progress, and conclusion. Music is important and sadly too often forgotten.

iPod shuffle: This is still the best solution for me to go running with because of its tiny size and it is distraction free. I love that the iPad shuffle is so inexpensive too.

Do I still use a laptop? Yes, but my iPad Pro is quickly replacing a lot of work. I currently use an older MacBook Air, but I hope to soon replace it with a new 13 inch MacBook Pro maxed out. I create a lot of video and produce a blog on my MacBook. I also write a lot, and it’s form, size and weight still feel the best for writing. I also use animation software that is not found on the iPad yet. So, the MacBook is still my professional level tool, however, as I mentioned, I am slowly but surely replacing jobs on the iPad occasionally and not looking back.