WEP 0053: Why Your School Needs a Moonshot.

The Importance of Doing Epic Things!

moon-landing-1920x1200-wallpaperIn this podcast, Kelly shares how he and his colleagues work together in a common TEAM time to make their school year meaningful and memorable for their students, and to make the biggest impact on individual learners. Kelly shares his vision for schools to do a “moonshot” to gather everyone under a common purpose and goal. This includes TEAM branding with silicone bracelets, a common slogan and so much more. Your school needs to do something so big it could be come legendary, or an epic fail. Fun and learning will result in either. Take a risk and join us on our annual “Big Deal” as we really, really need your shoes. Seriously! Give this episode a listen. This is an inspiring episode.

Mentioned in this podcast:

The Ask Pat Podcast and the SPI Blog and Podcast.

Your School Rocks! So tell people… by Ryan McLane and Eric Lowe: This is the book my principal read and started his video newsletter.

Apple’s iOS 10 Launch where our school, Oak Harbor Middle School was featured on the wall behind Tim Cook!

Swift Playgrounds a great new app for the iPad to help students (and everyone) learn to code in Swift.

Remember to join the Wired Educator Book Club.  Click here for more information!

Send us Your Shoes to:

Oak Harbor Middle School

c/o Kelly Croy

315 Church Street

Oak Harbor, Ohio  43449

Remember to tag your shoes with: where they are from, a quote, or who they are in memory of, or whatever you want!

Thank you.

 


(Enjoy the podcast & please subscribe & leave your review on iTunes. Thanks!)

Kelly Croy is an educator, author and speaker. 

You can subscribe and listen to his Wired Educator Podcast here.

Invite Kelly to speak at your event here.

Subscribe to The Wired Educator blog here.

Kelly’s book, Along Came a Leader is available for purchase here. 

Apple’s First iOS Developer Academy to Open in October

WESwift

Apple announced that its first iOS Developer Academy will open in October at the University of Naples Federico II in San Giovanni a Teaduccio, Naples, Italy. 

While Italy is pretty far for me, and many of the Wired Educator readers, this is still exciting for many reasons. 

This is the first academy, and the way the press release was worded in a join announcement by the University and Apple, saying it is the “first” means there will be more. Yay! I am excited and hoping for one near me soon.

Also, and maybe even more important is the fact that this iOS Developer Academy is FREE. That’s right, free. 

This first, free academy, will prepare more than 200 students with a nine month curriculum with more to follow after the first year. 

You can learn more at the University of Naples website where applicants will find an online test. Hmmmm. 

I have been working on my Swift coding and with the recent announcement of Swift Playgrounds at the last keynote, it appears that iOS developing is going big in the near future. It’s time for you and me to learn Swift and get in the game. 

Did I mention I am excited?

I have written many articles about learning Swift and iOS code in the classroom. This is another great step for students wanting to learn to code iOS apps. 

 

Google Announces Cast for Education

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I’m a big fan of Google tools that’s why I am thrilled to report of one of the many new updates from Google for educators, Cast for Education.

Cast for Education by Google was just released in beta and works or Mac OS, Windows and Chrome. It allows students and teachers to share their screens from anywhere in the classroom to the computer that’s plugged into the projector. Cast for Education’s best feature may be that it will make this process much easier for schools where wireless networks don’t always play nice for such features. (While I have not yet tried Cast for Education, my favorite method for sharing screens in the classroom is by Squirrels with their Ditto, Reflector, and AirParrot technology. The higher level features by squirrels offer many benefits not listed in the Google Cast for Education Announcement.)

To use the new service, the teacher’s computer would be connected to a projector and then the teacher invites the student to share their screen via Google Classroom. Any student on the roster in the teacher’s Google Classroom is eligible to share.

Cast for Education is a great benefit for schools. It looks easy to use and is free.

Part 4 of 4: Cutting More Than the Television Cord

A Four Part Series on The Ultimate Home Television Solution by Chris Hamady

I asked Chris Hamady, my friend and fellow Apple Distinguished Educator, to create the ultimate solution to home television streaming. While this is an educational blog, summer is here and many educators will be enjoying some television shows with their family.  Chris accepted the challenge and shares his incredibly handy tips, tricks, and hacks to help you create the ultimate home television streaming solution. Chris Hamady, quite frankly, is one of the most brilliant people I know. He can design and build anything. I knew this would be a fun challenge for him, and a benefit to my readers.  This is Chris’s second post to Wired Educator.  If you do not have Chris in your PLN, you are missing an incredible resource. There is always a solution. If you cannot figure it out, Chris can. Please connect with Chris on Twitter at @CHamady.


 

Part IV

You Own It!

2014-cross-device-video-analysisIn part 1 of this article, we investigated bringing in local television high definition broadcasts to your home using over-the-air antennas. In part 2, we looked at different subscription products to which you can stream cable TV and movie content over the internet. Part 3 looked at different hardware components enabling us to interact with that content: set-top-boxes, televisions, and audio gear. For this fourth and final segment, let’s see what we can do to distribute our personally owned audio and video media throughout our homes.

There are a number of solutions available to implement this type of functionality, but I have found that, by far, the easiest solution is using iTunes as your media hub. iTunes supports the sharing of both audio and video files, and can send them not only to computing devices, but also to certain types of speakers and speaker systems specifically designed for this purpose.

Airplay

One of the things that has always attracted me to Apple products, is the additional value that they provide on top of the basic functionality for which they are purchased. Over the past 12 years, Apple has developed their wireless audio and video technology to the point where we can now share our AV content from a dedicated computer’s iTunes library to any Macintosh computer, Apple TV, iOS device such as an iPhones and iPad, as well as to Airplay speakers throughout our homes which are connected to the data network. For the sake of a name, we will call this dedicated computer and central iTunes library a media center.

Media Center

The concept is simple. You create a shared iTunes library on a computer in your home that you dedicate as your media center. This computer will need to always be connected to your home network, always be turned on and awake, and logged into the account hosting the shared iTunes library if you want to be able to access your iTunes content quickly and easily. To enable iTunes sharing, go under the iTunes menu and choose Preferences, and then Sharing. Click the box next to, “Share my library on my local network.”

Next, you’ll want to turn on Home Sharing. Go to the File menu-Home Sharing and turn on Home Sharing. Enter your iTunes Store credentials. That’s it. You are done setting up your media center. Now you will be able to stream any videos or audio content that you have stored in the media center’s iTunes library to any other Apple devices in your home that support Home Sharing and it is enabled on those devices as well. More info on enabling Home Sharing on different types of devices can be accessed here:

See:

https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT202190

Note: In order to guarantee that your media is available to you 24/7 in your home, you might want to go into System Preferences and set the energy saver settings on this dedicated computer to “never sleep” or “ never power down” the computer. You also have the ability to customize the computer to sleep at say, 1:00 AM, and wake at 8:00 AM.

See:

https://support.apple.com/kb/PH18583?locale=en_US&viewlocale=en_US

What types of content can you store in iTunes? In addition to music, movies, and TV shows that you purchase from Apple, you can also convert audio CDs and DVDs that you own to digital files that can then be streamed. For audio CD conversion see:

https://support.apple.com/kb/PH20501?locale=en_US

For DVDs see:

http://www.macworld.com/article/1157590/how_to_rip_dvd_handbrake.html

Please note that the law isn’t entirely clear on the legality of converting DVDs that you own to files that you can stream. Please consider this before you decide one way or the other.

Streaming Audio and Video

Audio and video have different parameters when streaming. Audio streaming in iTunes allows you to create a “Sonos-like” system where you can send music from the media center’s iTunes to any and all Airplay-compatible speaker devices on your home network, simultaneously and fully synchronized throughout your home. Do you want some audio out on your deck? Purchase one of these (or any Airplay compatible speaker) and simply connect it to your wireless network:

https://www.amazon.com/Logitech-Speaker-980-000625-Discontinued-Manufacturer/dp/B005JW6WQU/ref=sr_1_sc_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1465911752&sr=8-1-spell&keywords=logitec+airplay

That Airplay speaker will then automatically show up in the media center’s iTunes app and you can now stream audio to that speaker, or any other Airplay speakers in your home independently or simultaneously. More info on that can be found here:

https://gigaom.com/2014/01/18/how-to-set-up-multiroom-audio-with-airplay-speakers-and-itunes/

If you have an Airport Express in your home, you can connect any powered speaker to the audio output of that device and turn that speaker into an Airplay speaker as well.

See:

https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT202192

Video

With video, you are limited to one independent stream to one device at a time, but multiple devices simultaneously, although asynchronously. What this means is that although you can watch a video on more than one TV, unlike audio, the playback is not synchronized on each device. I’m not sure why you would want to do this, I’m just pointing it out. 🙂

To play a video from your media center, make sure that Home Sharing is turned on in whatever device you want to watch the video on (iPad, Mac, iPhone, Apple TV, etc.), make sure that device is connected to your network, and follow the instructions to access the media.

See:

https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT202190

I suppose you can look at the differences between Airplay audio and video this way: you can PUSH audio to any speaker devices simultaneously that support Airplay, while any Apple device with a screen can individually PULL a video from the media center to it. It should also be noted that a Windows computer running iTunes can participate in Home Sharing playing music and videos hosted on the media center. Here is another Apple support article that does a good job explaining the different sharing configurations for Macs and Windows computers:

https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT201779

Updates

Lastly, part 3 of this article, published the day before Apple’s Worldwide Developer Conference, did not include much information about Apple TV. The reason being because at that time, Apple TV did not have a single product that gave you the ability to stream a substantial package of live television channels. Most of the Apple TV content at that point was consumed a la carte and required that you sign up and authenticate for individual access to each service. What a pain! Two important things happened yesterday that have changed my mind about Apple TV.

1. Single Sign-on. In the past, as I just mentioned, you had to authenticate to Netflix, then authenticate to Hulu, then authenticate to HBO, etc. With Single Sign-on, Apple hopes to have you authenticate to your Apple TV with your Apple ID, and any services to which you subscribe will automatically be associated to that Apple ID. You can then instantly interact with any of their content. It remains to be seen if this will work with services for which you have subscribed outside of Apple’s eco-system, but the concept looks promising.

2. Sling TV is now on Apple TV!!! This is the thing that puts Apple TV over the top for me. Our family is always switching between content that we have purchased from Apple, and Sling TV. This has meant going between the Apple TV and it’s remote, and a computer and it’s wireless keyboard and mouse. Being able to access most of our content with one remote will be a welcome change.

Conclusion

Finally, when I offered to do this article, I had no idea that it would turn out to be as long as it is. In the interest of keeping it as short as possible, I have certainly left some minor details out, details which should be covered in the many pages that I have linked to. Please don’t hesitate to contact me if you have any questions regarding the content covered in this blog post. If you do decide to move forward with some of what was discussed here, you will most certainly do more than just cut the cord to cable TV. By getting rid of our home phone, removing cable TV, converting all of our family member’s cellphones over to T-Mobile, and purchasing some online content along with a Buckeye 1 Internet package, our family has cut our monthly costs for telecommunications and media consumption by over $160.00 a month! I am sure that you too, can cut more than the cord.

©2016 C. Hamady


About the Author: 

ChrisHamadyADEWiredEducatorBlog

Chris Hamady is currently the Director of Technology for the Anthony Wayne School District in Ohio. Chris is an Apple Distinguished Educator  and the host of the annual CREATE Conference. Chris loves all manners of technology from cars, to computers, to streaming video solutions, and considers himself to be an educational technologist, musician, lifeflong learner, and runner.  Chris is currently working on his PhD in Curriculum Instruction at the University of Toledo. You can connect with Chris on Twitter @CHamady.

Cutting More Than the Cord: The Ultimate Televison Solution, Part 1 of 4

A Four Part Series on The Ultimate Home Television Solution by Chris Hamady

I asked Chris Hamady, my friend and fellow Apple Distinguished Educator, to create the ultimate solution to home television streaming. While this is an educational blog, summer is here and many educators will be enjoying some television shows with their family.  Chris accepted the challenge and shares his incredibly handy tips, tricks, and hacks to help you create the ultimate home television streaming solution. Chris Hamady, quite frankly, is one of the most brilliant people I know. He can design and build anything. I knew this would be a fun challenge for him, and a benefit to my readers.  This is Chris’s second post to Wired Educator.  If you do not have Chris in your PLN, you are missing an incredible resource. There is always a solution. If you cannot figure it out, Chris can. Please connect with Chris on Twitter at @CHamady.


Cutting More than the Television Cord, Part I

WE TV imageIf your family is like our family, over the past few years you have probably noticed that your media consumption habits have been dramatically changing. My wife and I began to watch less and less cable television content, and more online content such as Netflix, Amazon Prime Video, and iTunes movies. Our children were watching a little bit of Amazon Prime Video and Netflix, but were mostly watching content found on YouTube. It was around this time that I began to read about digital HDTV broadcast television and how many people were adopting new ways to minimize their monthly media bills while maximizing their viewing options.

First off, let’s begin with cable television. In order to leave cable TV behind, you will probably want some way to watch your live local television stations. This can easily be done by using an antenna. After doing some research, ok…ridiculous amounts of research, I decided to purchase the Mohu Leaf 50 Amplified indoor HDTV antenna. You can currently pick this antenna up for about 70 dollars on Amazon.com, but it can frequently be found on sale for less.

See:

http://www.amazon.com/Mohu-Paper-thin-Reversible-Performance-MH-110584/dp/B00APPDX86?ie=UTF8&keywords=moho%20leaf%20amplified&qid=1465352452&ref_=sr_1_2&sr=8-2

Now that I had an antenna, where would I mount it?